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2021 AAPT-APA Teaching Hub CFPs
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Co-organized by the APA's Committee on Teaching of Philosophy and the American Association of Philosophy Teachers

The AAPT-APA Teaching Hub is a series of interactive workshops and conversations designed specifically for philosophers and created to celebrate teaching within the context of the APA divisional meetings. Jointly organized by the APA Committee on the Teaching of Philosophy and the American Association of Philosophy Teachers, the Teaching Hub aims to offer a range of high quality and inclusive development opportunities that address the teaching of philosophy at all levels, pre-college though graduate school.


Note: The 2021 Eastern Division and Central Division meetings will not be held in person due to the COVID-19 pandemic. We are now developing plans to hold these meetings virtually. We will share additional information about the Pacific Division meeting, currently scheduled for March 31–April 3, 2021, in Portland, OR, as it becomes available. If you are considering submitting a proposal or abstract for any of the 2021 meetings, we encourage you to do so.


Calls for Proposals and Abstracts

Eastern Division Meeting

Central Division Meeting

Pacific Division Meeting

All Three Meetings


Eastern Division Meeting

Teaching Sustainability

Sustainability is closely connected to the content of many philosophy courses, often in surprising ways. These connections offer valuable opportunities to address these issues, recruit students, demonstrate the relevance of philosophy to contemporary concerns, and train generations of students to think critically about their role in the environment. Environmental issues can either be the subject of an entire course or make up a smaller component of courses with a broader focus.

For this reason, the APA Committee on the Teaching of Philosophy (CTP) and the American Association of Philosophy Teachers (AAPT) seek panelists for a session on teaching sustainability across the philosophy curriculum at the AAPT-APA Teaching Hub at the 2021 APA Eastern Division meeting, January 4–7, in New York, NY.

We envision approximately three different presentations on interesting or innovative ways to integrate environmental sustainability into philosophy courses. We hope to focus discussion on both contents and methods, that is, we would be interested in both what kind of texts dealing with environmental issues best fit traditional philosophy courses at various levels, and in innovative proposals regarding course structure, assignments, and pedagogical strategies that are best suited to discussing sustainability.

Consistent with the ethos of the AAPT, we expect presentations to be short, maybe fifteen minutes, engendering the sharing of ideas about different ways to teach sustainability among participants. As Teaching Hub sessions are expected to be highly interactive, we will appreciate proposals which include concrete ideas for interactivity.

Submissions: To submit a proposal for consideration, please email a proposal of no more than 500 words, prepared for anonymous review, to Alessandra Buccella (alb319@pitt.edu) by Monday, July 27, 2020, with the subject line “TH Sustainability session.” Please include a brief explanation of both your vision of what teaching sustainability in a philosophy course amounts to and the relevant experiences that led you to such vision. Supporting material, such as syllabi, handouts, or a CV, is also welcome; we are interested in ensuring representation of a range of voices. In the body of the email, please include your name, institutional affiliation (if any), position (if any), and contact information. The organizing committee will select 3–4 participants for the session by the end of July and will aim to assemble a session that is diverse in many respects, including career stage and institutional affiliation. We expect to select presenters by July 31, 2020.

Deadline for Proposals: July 27, 2020

Selection of Presenters: July 31, 2020

For questions about this session, please contact Alessandra at alb319@pitt.edu. For questions about the Teaching Hub at the Eastern APA, contact Rebecca Millsop at rmillsop@uri.edu.

The AAPT-APA Teaching Hub is a series of interactive workshops and conversations designed specifically for philosophers and created to celebrate teaching within the context of the APA divisional meetings. Jointly organized by the APA Committee on the Teaching of Philosophy (CTP) and the American Association of Philosophy Teachers (AAPT), the Teaching Hub aims to offer a range of high-quality and inclusive development opportunities that address the teaching of philosophy at all levels, pre-college through graduate school.

For general information about the AAPT-APA Teaching Hub, please check out the AAPT website and Facebook page and the CTP website and Facebook page.

Rethinking Upper-Division Courses for Non-Majors

The APA Committee on the Teaching of Philosophy (CTP) and the American Association of Philosophy Teachers (AAPT) seek presenters for a session at the AAPT-APA Teaching Hub at the 2021 APA Eastern Division meeting, January 4–7, in New York, NY. The topic of the session is Course Objectives & Learning Outcomes for Upper-Division Courses.

The basic question of this session is ‘What should we hope/expect students to learn in upper-division courses?’ We are especially interested in discussion focusing on students who are not philosophy majors and/or are not considering continuing to graduate school. Possible topics for the session include the following:

  • Transferable skills in the philosophy classroom
  • Service courses and courses for other programs
  • Interdisciplinary courses
  • Teaching upper-division students of diverse backgrounds
  • Teaching upper-division students with diverse education & career goals
  • Preparing students for alt-ac careers
  • Student autonomy in course design (negotiated curricula, co-constructed syllabi, etc.)
  • Balancing rigor and accessibility in upper-division courses

In other words, we are soliciting answers to the question ‘What is the point of an upper-division philosophy course, beyond grad-school prep?’ We invite submissions that approach this question from a variety of perspectives, including critical approaches that problematize the question or reject the premise. We are especially interested in concrete examples, skills, and strategies.

Format: Teaching Hub sessions are expected to be highly interactive. Proposals should indicate how audience members will participate in the session. One format is a presentation followed by Q&A. Others might have participants working through an interactive experience. The session will consist of three or four presenters. Group presentations are possible.

Submissions: Questions about this session, as well as proposals of no more than 750 words, prepared for anonymous review, should be emailed to Jerry Green  (jgreen67@uco.edu) by Monday, July 27, 2020

Please use the subject line “2021 Eastern APA-AAPT Teaching Hub Proposal.” Include a brief explanation of (a) use of specific course objectives and/or learning outcomes; (b) use of specific texts, assignments, modules, or other approaches to facilitating these objectives and outcomes; (c) your experience with implementing (a) and (b), and/or motivation for changing approaches or experimenting with new methods. Supporting material, such as syllabi or handouts, is also welcome. We are interested in ensuring representation of a range of voices. 

Deadline for Proposals: Monday, July 27, 2020

Selection of Presenters: Friday, July 31, 2020

For questions about this session, please contact Jerry Green at jgreen67@uco.edu. For questions about the Teaching Hub at the Eastern APA, contact Rebecca Millsop at rmillsop@uri.edu.

The AAPT-APA Teaching Hub is a series of interactive workshops and conversations designed specifically for philosophers and created to celebrate teaching within the context of the APA divisional meetings. Jointly organized by the APA Committee on the Teaching of Philosophy (CTP) and the American Association of Philosophy Teachers (AAPT), the Teaching Hub aims to offer a range of high-quality and inclusive development opportunities that address the teaching of philosophy at all levels, pre-college through graduate school.

For general information about the AAPT-APA Teaching Hub, please check out the AAPT website and Facebook page and the CTP website and Facebook page.

Teaching Core Texts: Mary Wollstonecraft

The APA Committee on the Teaching of Philosophy (CTP) seek panelists for a session on teaching Mary Wollstonecraft’s A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, Thoughts on The Education of Daughters, and related texts as part of the AAPT-APA Teaching Hub at the 2021 APA Eastern Division meeting, January 4–7, in New York, NY.

We envision approximately three to four different presentations on interesting or innovative approaches to teaching Wollstonecraft’s work. We hope to focus the discussion mainly on pedagogy, but would be interested in various approaches to content, if they are tied to conversations about teaching. One reason to focus on Wollstonecraft is to further the goal of broadening the canon. Of particular interest would be a discussion of using the work of Wollstonecraft, who engages with canonical texts, in place of those texts themselves. What is the value of presenting the canonical authors through the views of their marginalized contemporaries?

Format: Teaching Hub sessions are expected to be highly interactive. Proposals should indicate how audience members will participate in the session. One format is a presentation followed by Q&A. Others might have participants working through an interactive experience. Consistent with the ethos of the AAPT, we expect presentations to be short, maybe fifteen minutes, engendering the sharing of ideas about different ways to teach the text among participants. 

Submissions: Proposals of no more than 500 words, prepared for anonymous review, should be sent to Dustin Webster at dustinw1@upenn.edu by Monday, July 27, 2020. Please use the subject line “APA/AAPT Wollstonecraft.” Please include in the body of the email a brief note about your approach to and experience with teaching her work. Accompanying materials such as handouts, syllabi, etc. are welcome. Please anonymize any additional materials you include. We hope to select presenters by Friday, July 31, 2020.

Deadline for Proposals: Monday, July 27, 2020

Submit Proposals to: Dustin Webster, dustinw1@upenn.edu

Email Subject Line: APA/AAPT Wollstonecraft

Selection of Presenters: Friday, July 31, 2020

If you have any questions about the session, please feel free to contact Dustin Webster at dustinw1@upenn.edu. For questions about the Teaching Hub at the Eastern APA, contact Rebecca Millsop at rmillsop@uri.edu.

The AAPT-APA Teaching Hub is a series of interactive workshops and conversations designed specifically for philosophers and created to celebrate teaching within the context of the APA divisional meetings. Jointly organized by the APA Committee on the Teaching of Philosophy (CTP) and the American Association of Philosophy Teachers (AAPT), the Teaching Hub aims to offer a range of high-quality and inclusive development opportunities that address the teaching of philosophy at all levels, pre-college through graduate school.

For general information about the AAPT-APA Teaching Hub, please check out the AAPT website and Facebook page and the CTP website and Facebook page.

Central Division Meeting

Antiracist Pedagogies: Black Lives Matter in the Classroom

As part of the 2021 Teaching Hub, the American Association of Philosophy Teachers (AAPT) and the APA Committee on the Teaching of Philosophy (CTP) invite proposals for a session on teaching philosophy in this time of nationwide protests against police brutality and extra-legal state violence, in which a novel pandemic virus has brought to mainstream attention the 400-year-old pandemic of structural racism in the United States. Presentations might consider:

  • What does anti-racist pedagogy look like in this time of social upheaval?
  • How can the philosophy classroom engage the ethics and/or politics of recent protests through selected readings, exercises, projects, or community partnerships?
  • What have pedagogies looked like within the Black Lives Matter movement and other movements for social justice? How might the university classroom learn from non-academic activist pedagogies, especially when teaching about their work?

Format: Teaching Hub sessions are expected to be highly interactive. Proposals should indicate how audience members will participate in the session. One format is a presentation followed by Q&A. Others might have participants working through an interactive experience.

Submissions: Proposals of no more than 500 words, prepared for anonymous review, should be sent to Lauren Guilmette (lguilmette@elon.edu) by September 15, 2020.

Please include a brief explanation of your approach as well as your plan for the presentation. Supporting material such as syllabi, assignments, or handouts may also be included.

Deadline for proposals: September 15, 2020

The AAPT/APA Teaching Hub is a set of sessions about teaching philosophy held at each of the divisional meetings of the APA, emphasizing inclusive and collegial interactions. The Teaching Hub coordinates conversations about the teaching of philosophy at all levels, pre-college through graduate school. For more information about the Teaching Hub at the 2021 Central Division Meeting, please contact Claire Lockard (clockard@luc.edu).

Collaborative Assignments and Community in Online Classes

The American Association of Philosophy Teachers (AAPT) and the APA Committee on the Teaching of Philosophy (CTP) invite proposals for a session on Collaborative Assignments and Community in Online Classes at the Teaching Hub at the 2021 Central Division Meeting of the APA.

Educational research suggests that success in learning increases when students work in collaboration with each other. There is also research showing that when students learn in communities, it brings about better educational results. With the move to online teaching in philosophy, due to COVID-19 and other factors, it might seem difficult to create communities of the sort found in traditional face-to-face classrooms. This session will be an interactive workshop on methods to bring about learning communities and collaborative work in online course environments. Participants will offer ideas and techniques for doing collaborative work in online philosophy education.

Format: Teaching Hub sessions are expected to be highly interactive. Proposals should indicate how audience members will participate in the session. One format is a presentation followed by Q&A. Others might have participants working through an interactive experience. Sessions typically consist of three or four presenters.

Submissions: Proposals of no more than 500 words, prepared for anonymous review, should be sent to Fritz McDonald (fritzjmcdonald@oakland.edu) by September 15, 2020. Please include a brief explanation of your approach as well as your plan for the presentation. Supporting material such as syllabi, assignments, or handouts may also be included.

Deadline for proposals: September 15, 2020

The AAPT/APA Teaching Hub is a set of sessions about teaching philosophy held at each of the divisional meetings of the APA, emphasizing inclusive and collegial interactions. The Teaching Hub coordinates conversations about the teaching of philosophy at all levels, pre-college through graduate school. For more information about the Teaching Hub at the 2021 Central Division Meeting, contact Claire Lockard (clockard@luc.edu).

Graduate Voices in Teaching Philosophy

The American Association of Philosophy Teachers (AAPT) and the APA Committee on the Teaching of Philosophy (CTP) invite proposals for a session on Graduate Voices in Teaching Philosophy at the Teaching Hub at the 2021 Central Division Meeting of the APA.

Graduate students are a crucial part of the academy’s teaching workforce. Yet, they tend to occupy precarious economic, professional, and social positions, and their voices are rarely given sufficient uptake in discussions about teaching philosophy. This Teaching Hub session aims to respond to these issues by centering graduate student voices. This year’s session will focus on ways to transform the current practices surrounding being a Teaching Assistant. Being a TA is supposed to help prepare graduate students to be good teachers in the future. However, it is not always (or even usually) used to benefit the graduate TA who often receives the more monotonous work related to teaching, such as grading, without opportunities to practice other important teaching skills.

We invite proposals from current graduate students and recent graduates (doctorate received no earlier than September 1, 2019) with experience of teaching in graduate school as a TA or instructor of record. In order to help encourage and model collaboration between TAs and leads instructors, priority will be given to proposals for co-facilitation by a TA and a lead instructor. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Identifying best practices for structuring TAing as an opportunity to grow and develop the TA’s teaching skills.
  • Approaching TA-instructor relationships as an opportunity for mentoring.
  • Identifying best practices for creating valuable relationships between TAs and lead instructors.
  • Practical ways to scaffold learning opportunities for TAs over the duration of a course.
  • Identifying what support (pedagogical, emotional, financial, or other) is needed for TAs to feel safe practicing various aspects of teaching.
  • Practical ways to develop teaching skills while TAing without support from a lead instructor.

Format: Teaching Hub sessions are expected to be highly interactive. Proposals should indicate how audience members will participate in the session. One format might have participants working through an interactive experience or other learning activity. Proposals that include learning or reflection activities for participants are highly encouraged. Sessions typically consist of three or four presenters.

Submissions: Proposals of no more than 500 words, prepared for anonymous review, should be sent to Danielle Clevenger at dclevenger@wisc.edu no later than September 15, 2020. Please include a brief explanation of what you will share in your session, as well as your plan for the presentation of that material. Supporting materials such as syllabi, assignments, or handouts may also be included.

Deadline for proposals: September 15, 2020

The AAPT/APA Teaching Hub is a set of sessions about teaching philosophy held at each of the divisional meetings of the APA, emphasizing inclusive and collegial interactions. The Teaching Hub coordinates conversations about the teaching of philosophy at all levels, pre-college through graduate school. For more information about the Teaching Hub at the 2021 Central Division Meeting, contact Claire Lockard (clockard@luc.edu).

Teaching Existentialism Today

The American Association of Philosophy Teachers (AAPT) and the APA Committee on the Teaching of Philosophy (CTP) invite proposals for a session on Teaching Existentialism Today at the Teaching Hub at the 2021 Central Division Meeting of the APA.

The Existentialist Tradition forms a crucial part of the canon of philosophy; however, little attention has been paid to its incorporation in teaching philosophy beyond specialized course work on existentialism or advanced coursework in philosophy. This Teaching Hub session aims to ameliorate these issues by centering unique ways to approach existentialism through incorporating existentialist texts at all levels of philosophical instruction. We invite proposals from current instructors at all points in their careers. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Unique perspectives that existentialist philosophies bring to “the canon.”
  • Teaching existentialist philosophy in introduction courses, in ethics courses, or in courses not specifically focused on existentialist philosophy.
  • Teaching non-Western, feminist, queer, and existentialists of color.
  • Rethinking existentialism as a part of the “canon” or as “core” texts in philosophy.
  • Particular challenges that instructors face when teaching existentialist texts, and how to deal with them.
  • Teaching existentialist philosophy with reference to social, cultural, or political issues in modernity.

Format: Teaching Hub sessions are expected to be highly interactive. Proposals should indicate how audience members will participate in the session. One format is a presentation followed by Q&A. Others might have participants working through an interactive experience. Sessions typically consist of three or four presenters.

Submissions: Proposals of no more than 500 words, prepared for anonymous review, should be sent to Johnathan Flowers at jflowers@worcester.edu with the subject “Teaching Existentialism Today” by September 15, 2020. Please include a brief explanation of your approach as well as your plan for the presentation. Supporting material such as syllabi, assignments, or handouts may also be included.

Deadline for proposals: September 15, 2020

The AAPT/APA Teaching Hub is a set of sessions about teaching philosophy held at each of the divisional meetings of the APA, emphasizing inclusive and collegial interactions. The Teaching Hub coordinates conversations about the teaching of philosophy at all levels, pre-college through graduate school. For more information about the Teaching Hub at the 2021 Central Division Meeting, contact Claire Lockard (clockard@luc.edu).

Pacific Division Meeting

Improving Teaching Philosophy Online

The Teaching Hub is a collaborative meeting space, co-sponsored by the APA Committee on Teaching Philosophy (CTP) and the American Association of Philosophy Teachers (AAPT), which hosts a series of informative programs about the teaching of philosophy at divisional meetings of the APA.

Given the Covid-19 global pandemic, a much larger proportion of philosophy teaching has moved online. This session will focus on successful practices to improve online courses and make them meaningful for students with proven efficacy. Teaching Hub sessions are expected to be interactive, and proposals should address how they will engage the audience. Presentations may encourage participants to download materials that they can implement and take with them. The presentation may also introduce the audience to interesting resources or campus materials for online learning. Possible topics include the following:

  • Deepening discussion online
  • Streaming presentations more effectively
  • Making online teaching more engaging
  • Having difficult conversations on sensitive topics in an online environment
  • Building community among students online
  • Fostering resilience for student success online
  • Encouraging reading online
  • Designing meaningful online assessments
  • Making online curriculum diverse
  • Building easily adaptable courses from in person to hybrid or online
  • Developing accessible courses for students lacking access to technology
  • Grading practices that keep the workload manageable
  • Or other topics with proven effectiveness in the online teaching of philosophy

Deadline for proposals: September 1, 2020

Submissions: Proposals of no more than 500 words (in .doc, .docx, or .pdf form), prepared for anonymous review, with the subject line Online Teaching, should be sent to Karin Fry, kfry@georgiasouthern.edu by September 1, 2020. In the accompanying email, please include your name, institutional affiliation (if any), position (if any), and contact information. The organizing committee will select participants by September 30, 2020. Questions about this session should be directed to Karin Fry at the above email address.

Top Five Thoughts on Teaching Philosophy

The APA Committee on the Teaching of Philosophy (CTP) and the American Association of Philosophy Teachers (AAPT) seeks a later-career philosopher to be part of a “Top Five Thoughts on Teaching Philosophy” panel of the Teaching Hub at the 2021 APA Pacific Division meeting, April 2, in Portland, OR.

The AAPT-APA Teaching Hub is a series of interactive workshops and conversations designed specifically for philosophers and created to celebrate teaching within the context of the APA divisional meetings. The Teaching Hub aims to offer a range of high-quality and inclusive development opportunities that address the teaching of philosophy at all levels, pre-college through graduate school.

The purpose of the “My Top Five” session is to bring together later-career philosophers to present a brief “top five” list. Each panelist will read and explain their list for 10-15 minutes, followed by a brief Q&A period. Teaching Hub sessions are expected to be highly interactive.

When considering developing a proposal, please think of this session as an occasion to have a bit of fun while passing on a bit of wisdom. Please feel free to be very creative, but here are a few topics that may be instructive as you develop a proposal:

  • Five reasons why I love teaching introductory courses
  • Five embarrassing teaching moments and the lessons I learned
  • The five principles that guide my teaching choices
  • Five stories of students doing surprising and excellent work that I tried to make happen more often
  • Why I can’t imagine teaching without having read these five texts
  • Five best career decisions I ever made
  • Five lessons ancient philosophers have taught me about teaching

Deadline for proposals: September 1, 2020

Submissions: Please submit proposals to PacificAPAMyTop5@gmail.com. The deadline for submissions is September 1, 2020. If you have any questions or concerns about this call, please contact Cecilea Mun at PacificAPAMyTop5@gmail.com.

All Three Meetings

Eastern, Central, and Pacific AAPT-APA Teaching Hub Poster Sessions

The APA Committee on the Teaching of Philosophy (CTP) and the American Association of Philosophy Teachers (AAPT) invite abstracts for the three AAPT-APA Teaching Hub poster sessions to be held throughout the spring of 2021.

Each Teaching Hub includes a reception and poster session featuring both independent work by undergraduate students and innovative work in the teaching of philosophy by faculty and graduate students. If you have something of your own to share with your colleagues—a new teaching technique, course proposal, assessment strategy, in-class activity, or SoTL research finding—please consider submitting an abstract to one of the Teaching Hub poster sessions below. Please also encourage undergraduates who have completed independent work in philosophy this past academic year and undergraduates who are working on summer research projects in philosophy currently to submit their abstracts.

We are looking for proposals for either two kinds of posters:

  1. Undergraduate students
    Posters featuring independent research by undergraduates (e.g., thesis, independent study). Deadline: November 15, 2020
  2. Faculty or graduate students
    Posters featuring pedagogical innovations or Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL). Deadline: August 15, 2020

Please e-mail abstracts of no more than 300 words as PDF attachments, prepared for anonymous review, to Kristina Grob (grobkris@uscsumter.edu) with the subject line "2021 (Eastern, Central, or Pacific) TH poster session submission."

Seniors preparing thesis/capstone work: If you (with the recommendation of your faculty mentor) would like to present your work at one of our poster sessions but don’t have much to show by November 15, please consider submitting a proposal anyway!

You may submit a proposal to more than one poster session. However, we will only accept distinct proposals to different poster sessions. If you would like to submit the same proposal to more than one poster session, please include in your email a ranking of your preferred meeting locations.

  • Eastern Teaching Hub Poster Session: January 6, 2021, New York, NY
  • Central Teaching Hub Poster Session: February 26, 2021, New Orleans, LA
  • Pacific Teaching Hub Poster Session: April 3, 2021, Portland, OR

The Teaching Hub aims to be an especially inclusive and collegial event, designed to recognize exceptional teaching and mentorship. Faculty members who have organized a trip with a group of undergraduates to one of the APA divisional meetings, in order to present work at the Teaching Hub, have described the experience as transformative for their students.

Statement on COVID-19: While we are currently planning for an in-person poster session at each of the divisional meetings, changes to local and state guidelines may require late modification of our plans. We are exploring the possibilities of and requirements for virtual poster sessions should that become necessary.

We look forward to receiving your submissions.

Kristina Grob and Kaitlin Louise Pettit
2021 Teaching Hub Poster Session Co-Coordinators

Rebecca Millsop and Wendy Turgeon
2021 Eastern Teaching Hub Co-Chairs

Claire Lockard and Giancarlo Tarantino
2021 Central Teaching Hub Co-Chairs

Cecilea Mun and Renee Smith
2021 Pacific Teaching Hub Co-Chairs

The AAPT-APA Teaching Hub is a series of interactive workshops and conversations designed specifically for philosophers and created to celebrate teaching within the context of the APA divisional meetings. Jointly organized by the CTP and the AAPT, the Teaching Hub aims to offer a range of high-quality and inclusive development opportunities that address the teaching of philosophy at all levels, pre-college through graduate school.

Important note: Neither the APA nor the AAPT can offer funding to Teaching Hub participants for travel or lodging. Moreover, to present at the Teaching Hub, participants must both join the APA and register for the appropriate meeting (less than $30 total for undergraduates). Please alert your students to these facts before they apply and consider reserving institutional funding for their participation.

AAPT-APA Teaching Hub page

The American Philosophical Association
University of Delaware
31 Amstel Avenue, Newark, DE 19716
Phone: 302.831.1112 | Fax: 302.831.8690
Email: info@apaonline.org