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2019 AAPT-APA Teaching Hub CFPs
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Co-organized by the APA's Committee on Teaching of Philosophy and the American Association of Philosophy Teachers

The AAPT-APA Teaching Hub is a series of interactive workshops and conversations designed specifically for philosophers and created to celebrate teaching within the context of the APA divisional meetings. Jointly organized by the APA Committee on the Teaching of Philosophy and the American Association of Philosophy Teachers, the Teaching Hub aims to offer a range of high quality and inclusive development opportunities that address the teaching of philosophy at all levels, pre-college though graduate school.


2019 Eastern Division Meeting

January 7–10, 2019

Sheraton New York Times Square
811 7th Avenue
53rd Street
New York, New York 10019
United States

2019 Central Division Meeting

February 20–23, 2019

The Westin Downtown Denver
1672 Lawrence Street
Denver, Colorado 80202
United States

2019 Pacific Division Meeting

April 17–20, 2019

Westin Bayshore
1601 Bayshore Drive
Vancouver, British Columbia V6G 2V4
Canada


Calls for Proposals and Abstracts

Eastern Division Meeting

Central Division Meeting

Pacific Division Meeting

All Three Meetings

Back to the 2019 AAPT-APA Teaching Hub page


Eastern Division Meeting

Teaching Core Texts: Gettier's "Is Justified True Belief Knowledge?"

The APA Committee on the Teaching of Philosophy (CTP) and the American Association of Philosophy Teachers (AAPT) seek panelists for a session on teaching Edmund Gettier's "Is Justified True Belief Knowledge?" at the AAPT-APA Teaching Hub at the Eastern Divisional Meeting of the American Philosophical Association in New York City, January 7–10, 2019.

We envision three or four different presentations on interesting or innovative approaches to teaching the Gettier problem at any level, pre-college through graduate school. We hope to focus discussion mainly on pedagogy, including questions both about how best to teach this topic and about whether we should be teaching it at all. We may also be interested in presentations about the content of Gettier’s article, especially if they are tied to conversations about teaching. We encourage critical approaches to teaching the Gettier problem that may challenge us to think about why and how we teach canonical texts.

Consistent with the ethos of the AAPT, we expect presentations to be short, maybe twenty-to-thirty minutes, engendering the sharing of ideas about different ways to teach the text among participants. We will appreciate proposals which include concrete ideas about how to make the session interactive.

Proposals of no more than 500 words, prepared for anonymous review, should be sent to Russell Marcus, rmarcus1@hamilton.edu, by August 31, 2018. Please include a brief explanation of both your approach to teaching the core text and your experiences doing so. Supporting material, such as syllabi, handouts, or a CV, is also welcome. We are interested in ensuring representation of a range of voices. We expect to select presenters by September 30, 2018.

Introducing Students to Philosophy: New Approaches

The APA Committee on Teaching Philosophy and American Association of Philosophy Teachers invite proposals for a 2019 Teaching Hub session on the topic of how best to introduce students to the field of philosophy. Though students entering college typically are familiar with disciplines such as history, biology, and mathematics, they often do not know what to expect from philosophy. Teachers of students new to philosophy must do more than simply present the next stage of material. We have to convey some sense of what philosophy is, and we have to explain to students—often very efficiently—how to read it, discuss it, and write it. Most importantly, we have to motivate the whole project: we have to explain why the study of philosophy is valuable and drum up some enthusiasm for our antiquated texts.

For this Teaching Hub session, we are looking for presenters willing to share promising new approaches, in either content selection or pedagogy, to these challenges. Sample topics include, but are not limited to the following:

  • The best first text: what to assign first in an introductory philosophy class
  • Editorial columns as an inroad to philosophical dialectic
  • Philosophy the old-fashioned way: how to bring millennials to love our canon
  • Productive uses of social media
  • Capitalizing on the wisdom that comes with age: teaching new adult learners
  • Introducing high school students to philosophy through summer camps

To submit a proposal for consideration, please email Karl Aho (KAHO@tarleton.edu) by Friday, August 24, 2018, with the subject line "Introducing Students 2019 Teaching Hub." In the body of the email, please include your name, institutional affiliation (if any), position (if any), and contact information. Attached to the email, please include an anonymized proposal of 500 to 750 words in PDF form describing both what you plan to present and what you hope the audience will take away from your presentation. The organizing committee will select 3–4 participants for the session by early September and will aim to assemble a panel that is diverse in all of the relevant respects, including career stage and institutional affiliation.

STEM Collaborations in the Philosophy Classroom

The AAPT-APA Teaching Hub is a series of interactive workshops and conversations designed specifically for philosophers and created to celebrate teaching within the context of the APA divisional meetings. Jointly organized by the APA's Committee on the Teaching of Philosophy (CTP) and the American Association of Philosophy Teachers (AAPT), the Teaching Hub aims to offer a range of high-quality and inclusive development opportunities that address the teaching of philosophy at all levels, pre-college through graduate school.

The CTP invites abstracts for a 2019 Teaching Hub session on the topic of how philosophy teachers do or might collaborate with various STEM classrooms to create new learning opportunities for both populations of students. This might include details around the following:

  • Identifying possible collaborators at your institution;
  • Successes (or cautionary tales!) of collaboration;
  • Revamping a course to cross-list it with a STEM program;
  • Ways to assess successes in cross-listed STEM/philosophy courses;
  • Articulating learning goals for STEM colleagues who may not already see the value of collaboration with philosophy teachers;
  • Experiential learning collaborations or opportunities outside of the classroom;
  • Community-based learning with STEM collaborators;
  • Creative collaborations that reach beyond cross-listed or co-taught courses (single experiments or lessons done by multiple classes in one setting, etc.)
  • Teaching demos
  • Or other related topics.

Some possible examples of collaborations might be as follows:

  • Embodied Philosophy and Robotics
  • Mathematics and Metaphysics
  • Neuroscience and Philosophy of Mind
  • Human Nature and Evolution
  • Physics and the Philosophy of Time
  • Ethics and Software Design
  • Art and Art History of Scientific Modeling
  • Aesthetics and the Brain

While some of these are courses taught routinely by philosophers, the committee is hoping that we will explore true collaborations for this panel! Want to know how you can reach the STEM audience? Have ideas for how to approach STEM colleagues? We’d love to hear from you!

To submit an abstract for consideration, please email Robin Zebrowski (zebrowsr@beloit.edu) by August 30, 2018 with the subject line “STEM Collaborations” In the body of the email, please include your name, institutional affiliation (if any), position (if any), and contact information. Attached to the email, please include an anonymized abstract of 500 to 750 words as a .pdf document. The organizing committee will select participants for the session by late August and will aim to assemble a panel that is diverse in all of the relevant respects, including career stage and institutional affiliation. Please be explicit in your abstract if you are looking to give a teaching demo, creative presentation, or traditional paper, all of which are welcome!

Central Division Meeting

Teaching Core Texts: Plato's Apology

The APA Committee on the Teaching of Philosophy (CTP) and the American Association of Philosophy Teachers (AAPT) invite proposals for a session on teaching Plato’s Apology at the AAPT/APA Teaching Hub at the 2019 Central Division meeting of the APA, February 20–23, in Denver, CO.

We are seeking presentations on interesting or innovative approaches to teaching the Apology in undergraduate classes. We hope to focus discussion mainly on pedagogy but would be interested in various approaches to content, if they are tied to conversations about teaching. We also encourage critical approaches to teaching Plato that may challenge us to think about why and how we teach canonical texts.

Format: Presentations should be 20 minutes in length and designed to engender conversation about pedagogy. Approximately 20 minutes of additional time will be available to each presenter for activities and/or discussion with the audience. We appreciate proposals that are creative and interactive.

Submissions: Proposals of no more than 500 words, prepared for anonymous review, should be sent to Susan Mills, millss5@macewan.ca, by September 4, 2018. Please include a brief explanation of both your approach to teaching the core text and your experiences doing so. Supporting material, such as syllabi, handouts, or a CV, is also welcome. Submissions from faculty at all types of institutions of higher learning will be considered; we are interested in ensuring representation of a range of voices and teaching experiences.

Deadline for proposals: Tuesday, September 4, 2018.

Selection of Presenters: September 15, 2018 (expected)

Questions about this session should be directed to Susan Mills at millss5@macewan.ca.

Teaching Philosophical Writing

The APA Committee on the Teaching of Philosophy and the APA Committee on Philosophy in Two-Year Colleges invite proposals for a session on teaching philosophical writing as part of the AAPT/APA Teaching Hub at the 2019 Central Division meeting of the APA, February 20–23, in Denver, CO.

We are seeking presentations on effective or innovative approaches to teaching philosophical writing in undergraduate or graduate classes. This is an opportunity to share your approach, advice, and assignments with your colleagues, and learn from them as well. Presentations that discuss the feedback process are also welcome.

Format: The session will consist of three or four brief presentations (approximately 20–30 minutes in length) with additional time allotted for questions and discussion. Interactive presentations that are focused on audience learning are appreciated. Submissions from faculty at all types of institutions of higher learning will be considered.

Submissions: Proposals of no more than 500 words, prepared for anonymous review, should be sent to Aaron Champene, achampene@stlcc.edu, by September 4, 2018.

Deadline for proposals: Tuesday, September 4, 2018.

Selection of Presenters: September 15, 2018 (expected)

Questions about this session should be directed to Aaron Champene at the above e-mail address.

AAPT Workshop: Innovative Pedagogies for a Just Classroom

The American Association of Philosophy Teachers (AAPT), in collaboration with the APA Committee on the Teaching of Philosophy (CTP), seeks presentations for an AAPT interactive workshop at the upcoming Teaching Hub at the 2019 Central Division meeting of the APA, February 20–23, in Denver, CO.

We are seeking teachers prepared to demonstrate an innovative approach to philosophical pedagogy that aims at achieving justice in the classroom. The goal of an AAPT workshop is to leave session attendees with a new pedagogical technique that they can incorporate into their classes. In most cases, this involves creating a lesson plan for the workshop that enables session attendees to explore the technique interactively, as active learners, rather than passively, as witnesses to a presentation.

We will aim to assemble a panel that is diverse in all of the relevant respects, including career stage and institutional affiliation.

Format: Presentations should be 30–45 minutes in length and should include a description of what attendees will learn and do during the session.

Submissions: Proposals of no more than 500 words should be sent to Rebecca Scott, rebecca.g.scott@gmail.com, by September 4, 2018. Please include an explanation of the proposed presentation, highlighting any of its especially innovative and/or interactive aspects.

Deadline for proposals: Tuesday, September 4, 2018.

Questions about this session should be directed to Rebecca Scott at the above email address.

Pacific Division Meeting

Teaching Core Texts: Thomson's "A Defense of Abortion"

The APA Committee on the Teaching of Philosophy (CTP) and the American Association of Philosophy Teachers (AAPT) invite proposals for a session on teaching Judith Thomson's "A Defense of Abortion." This session will be held at the Teaching Hub at the 2019 Pacific Division meeting of the APA, which runs April 17–20, 2019, in Vancouver, BC, Canada. 
 
We are seeking presentations on interesting or innovative approaches to teaching Thomson's seminal work. Thomson’s article framed the debate about the permissibility of abortion in the professional philosophical literature, and given its somewhat labyrinthine argumentation, many different approaches to teaching her work can be expected. We hope to focus discussion mainly on pedagogy but would be interested in various approaches to content, if they are tied to conversations about teaching. 
 
Format: Presentations should be 20 minutes in length and designed to engender conversation about pedagogy. Approximately 20 minutes of additional time will be available to each presenter for activities and/or discussion with the audience. We appreciate proposals that are creative and interactive.
 
Submissions: Proposals of no more than 500 words, prepared for anonymous review, should be sent to Ian Smith, ian.smith1@washburn.edu. Deadline for receipt of proposals is September 15, 2018. Please include a brief explanation of both your approach to teaching the core text and your experiences doing so. Supporting material, such as syllabi, handouts, or a CV, is also welcome. Submissions from teachers at all types of institutions will be considered; we are interested in ensuring representation of a range of voices and teaching experiences.
 
Deadline for proposals: September 15, 2018.
 
Notification to presenters: October 1, 2018 (expected)
 
Questions about this session should be directed to Ian Smith at ian.smith1@washburn.edu.
 

New Approaches to the Early Modern Survey

The APA Committee on the Teaching of Philosophy (CTP) and the American Association of Philosophy Teachers (AAPT) invite proposals for a session on new approaches to teaching early modern survey courses. This session will be held at the Teaching Hub at the 2019 Pacific Division meeting of the APA, which runs April 17–20, 2019, in Vancouver, BC, Canada. 
 
With an aim of sharing and inspiring teaching that rethinks the standard canon that students typically encounter in early modern philosophy courses, we are seeking a variety of presentations on interesting or innovative approaches to teaching the early modern survey in ways that incorporate lesser-known philosophers and texts of the period. Specific ideas about course content are especially encouraged. As well, discussions about pedagogical approaches to that content are also welcome at this session. 
 
Format: Presentations should be 20 minutes in length. Approximately 20 minutes of additional time will be available to each presenter for activities and/or discussion with the audience. We appreciate proposals that are creative and interactive.
 
Submissions: Proposals of no more than 500 words, prepared for anonymous review, should be sent to Susan Mills at millss5@macewan.ca. Since we are interested in ensuring representation of a range of voices and teaching experiences and welcome submissions from those who have taught in various types of educational institutions, please include in your proposal a brief account of your experiences with non-standard approaches to early modern philosophy. Supporting material, such as syllabi, handouts, or a CV, may also be included in addition to your proposal submission.
 
Deadline for proposals: September 15, 2018
 
Notification to presenters: October 1, 2018 (expected)
 
Questions about this session should be directed to Susan Mills at millss5@macewan.ca.
 

All Three Meetings

2019 Eastern, Central, and Pacific AAPT-APA Teaching Hub Poster Sessions

The APA Committee on the Teaching of Philosophy (CTP) and the American Association of Philosophy Teachers (AAPT) invite abstracts for the three AAPT-APA Teaching Hub poster sessions to be held throughout the spring semester of 2019.

The AAPT-APA Teaching Hub is a series of interactive workshops and conversations designed specifically for philosophers and created to celebrate teaching within the context of the APA divisional meetings. Jointly organized by the CTP and the AAPT, the Teaching Hub aims to offer a range of high-quality and inclusive development opportunities that address the teaching of philosophy at all levels, pre-college through graduate school.

We close each Teaching Hub with a reception and poster session featuring both (1) independent work by undergraduate students and (2) innovative work in the teaching of philosophy by faculty and graduate students. If you have something of your own to share with your colleagues—a new teaching technique, course proposal, assessment strategy, in-class activity, or SoTL research finding—please consider submitting an abstract to one of the Teaching Hub poster sessions below, and please encourage undergraduates who have completed independent work in philosophy this past academic year and undergraduates who are working on summer research projects in philosophy currently to submit an abstract to one of the Teaching Hub poster sessions below.

Important note: Neither the APA nor the AAPT can offer funding to Teaching Hub participants for travel or lodging. Moreover, to present at the Teaching Hub, participants must both join the APA and register for the appropriate meeting (less than $30 total for undergraduates). Please alert your students to these facts before they apply and consider reserving institutional funding for their participation.

1) Eastern Teaching Hub Poster Session: January 7–10, 2019, New York, NY

We invite proposals for two different kinds of posters that will be featured: 1) posters by faculty or graduate students describing a pedagogical innovation or original SoTL project; and 2) posters by undergraduates featuring the topic of an honors thesis, summer research project, or other independent research project. We particularly encourage undergraduates to submit who live or study near New York City.

Please e-mail abstracts of no more than 300 words as PDF attachments to Alexandra Bradner (alexandrabradner@gmail.com) no later than September 1, 2018, with the subject line "2019 Eastern TH poster session submission." Format your abstract for anonymous review.

2) Central Teaching Hub Poster Session: February 20–23, 2019, Denver, CO

We invite proposals for two different kinds of posters that will be featured: 1) posters by faculty or graduate students describing a pedagogical innovation or original SoTL project; and 2) posters by undergraduates featuring the topic of an honors thesis, summer research project, or other independent research project. We particularly encourage undergraduates to submit who live or study near Denver.

Please e-mail abstracts of no more than 300 words as PDF attachments to Kaitlin Louise Pettit (Kaitlin.Pettit@utah.edu) no later than September 13, 2018, with the subject line "2019 Central TH poster session submission." Format your abstract for anonymous review.

3) Pacific Teaching Hub Poster Session: April 17–20, 2019, Vancouver, BC, Canada

We invite proposals for two different kinds of posters that will be featured: 1) posters by faculty or graduate students describing a pedagogical innovation or original SoTL project; and 2) posters by undergraduates featuring the topic of an honors thesis, summer research project, or other independent research project. We particularly encourage undergraduates to submit who live or study near Vancouver.

Please e-mail abstracts of no more than 300 words as PDF attachments to Kaitlin Louise Pettit (Kaitlin.Pettit@utah.edu) no later than September 15, 2018, with the subject line "2019 Pacific TH poster session submission." Format your abstract for anonymous review.

The Teaching Hub is an especially inclusive and collegial event, designed to recognize exceptional teaching and mentorship. Faculty members who have organized a trip with a group of undergraduates to one of the APA divisional meetings, in order to present work at the Teaching Hub, have described the experience as transformative for their students.

We look forward to receiving your submissions.

Back to the 2019 AAPT-APA Teaching Hub page

The American Philosophical Association
University of Delaware
31 Amstel Avenue, Newark, DE 19716
Phone: 302.831.1112 | Fax: 302.831.8690
Email: info@apaonline.org