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2020 AAPT-APA Teaching Hub CFPs
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Co-organized by the APA's Committee on Teaching of Philosophy and the American Association of Philosophy Teachers

The AAPT-APA Teaching Hub is a series of interactive workshops and conversations designed specifically for philosophers and created to celebrate teaching within the context of the APA divisional meetings. Jointly organized by the APA Committee on the Teaching of Philosophy and the American Association of Philosophy Teachers, the Teaching Hub aims to offer a range of high quality and inclusive development opportunities that address the teaching of philosophy at all levels, pre-college though graduate school.


2020 Eastern Division Meeting

January 8–11, 2020

Sheraton Philadelphia Downtown
201 North 17th Street
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19103
United States

2020 Central Division Meeting

February 26–29, 2020

The Palmer House Hilton
17 E. Monroe Street
Chicago, Illinois 60603
United States

2020 Pacific Division Meeting

April 8–11, 2020

Westin St. Francis
335 Powell Street
San Francisco, California 94102
United States


Calls for Proposals and Abstracts

Eastern Division Meeting

Central Division Meeting

Pacific Division Meeting

All Three Meetings


Eastern Division Meeting

Creative Assignments for Practicing Philosophical Skills

The APA Committee on the Teaching of Philosophy (CTP) and the American Association of Philosophy Teachers (AAPT) seek presenters for a session on the topic of creative assignments for practicing philosophical skills at the AAPT-APA Teaching Hub at the 2020 APA Eastern Division meeting, January 8–11, 2020, in Philadelphia, PA. We aim to have the session especially highlight ideas that prepare students to usefully deploy these skills in contexts outside of the philosophy classroom (in their other classes, in making life-decisions, in their future careers, etc.).

Possible topics include assignments that involve the following:

  • Immersive experiences (e.g., having students spend a week living like a Stoic);
  • Unique methods for working with real-world case studies;
  • Op-eds or writing assignments for broader audiences;
  • Service-learning components;
  • Making connections between theoretical philosophy and applied contexts (e.g., the impact of the metaphysics of causation on law);
  • Having students identify patterns of logical reasoning online or elsewhere in their lives;
  • Role-playing games to prepare students to deploy philosophical skills in an embedded context;
  • Personal journaling assignments;
  • Analysis of pop-culture or other media through a philosophical lens;
  • Opportunities for students to build bridges with other disciplinary interests;
  • Among other topics

To submit a proposal for consideration, please email August Gorman (gorman.august@gmail.com) by Monday, July 15, 2019, with the subject line Creative Assignments for Practicing Philosophical Skills 2020.” In the body of the email, please include your name, institutional affiliation (if any), position (if any), and contact information. Attached to the email, please include an anonymized abstract of 500–750 words (in PDF form) that answers the following questions: 1) What is the assignment, and how does it work? 2) What sorts of skills does it help students practice? 3) How do you plan to present this idea at the Teaching Hub session (Will you share samples of student work? Will you involve attendees in an interactive demo? Will you discuss the advantage of your approach over competing approaches?)?

The organizing committee will select 3–4 participants for the session by the end of July and will aim to assemble a session that is diverse in many respects, including career stage and institutional affiliation.

For questions about this session, please contact August at gorman.august@gmail.com. For questions about the Teaching Hub at the Eastern APA, contact Wendy Turgeon at turgeon@optonline.net.

The Teaching Hub is a collaborative meeting space, co-sponsored by the APA Committee on the Teaching of Philosophy (CTP) and the American Association of Philosophy Teachers (AAPT), that hosts a series of informative programs about the teaching of philosophy at divisional meetings of the APA. This is an opportunity to share your approach, advice, and assignments with your colleagues, and learn from them as well.

Teaching Large Courses

The APA Committee on the Teaching of Philosophy (CTP) and the American Association of Philosophy Teachers (AAPT) seek panelists for a session on teaching large courses at the AAPT-APA Teaching Hub, at the 2020 APA Eastern Division meeting, January 8–11, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Our goal is to have several presentations on innovative approaches to teaching courses where enrollment is 50 or more students. Our hope is to concentrate mainly on pedagogy. We encourage critical approaches to incorporating social media platforms within the purview of teaching large courses.

Consistent with the ethos of the AAPT, we expect presentations to be brief, encouraging an exchange of ideas about different methods to teach large courses. We appreciate proposals that include specific ideas about how to make the session interactive.

Submissions: Proposals of no more than 500 words, prepared for anonymous review, should be sent to LaChanda Davis, lachandacdavis@sfsu.edu, by July 27, 2019. Please include a brief explanation of both your approach to teaching large courses and your experiences doing so. Supporting material, such as syllabi, handouts, or a CV, is also welcome. We are interested in ensuring representation of a range of perspectives. We expect to select presenters by early August 2019.

Deadline for Proposals: July 27, 2019

Selection of Presenters: early August 2019 (expected)

Questions about this session should be directed to LaChanda Davis at the email address indicated above.

The AAPT-APA Teaching Hub is a series of interactive workshops and conversations designed specifically for philosophers and created to celebrate teaching within the context of the APA divisional meetings. Jointly organized by the APA Committee on the Teaching of Philosophy (CTP) and the American Association of Philosophy Teachers (AAPT), the Teaching Hub aims to offer a range of high-quality and inclusive development opportunities that address the teaching of philosophy at all levels, pre-college through graduate school.

For general information about the AAPT-APA Teaching Hub, please check out the AAPT website and Facebook page and the CTP website and Facebook page. For more specific information about the Teaching Hub at the 2020 Eastern APA meeting in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, please contact Wendy Turgeon at turgeon@optonline.net.

Facilitating a Philosophy Classroom: From Triggers to Cell Phones

The APA Committee on the Teaching of Philosophy (CTP) and the American Association of Philosophy Teachers (AAPT) seeks panelists for a session on dealing with various kinds of students and facilitating a philosophy classroom at the AAPT-APA Teaching Hub at the Eastern Divisional Meeting of the American Philosophical Association in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania January 8–11, 2020.

We envision three or four different presentations focusing on creating a classroom environment in which all students can learn—especially in courses that may create triggering conditions for some students in terms of their mental health, such as those students who have experienced some trauma relating to the course content. Given that instructors are neither mental health specialists nor counselors, this session is intended to provide instructors with a set of tools to help them create a classroom atmosphere in which all students are able to learn.

We also want presentations that may touch on dealing with mundane situations, including overly outspoken students, cell phone usage, and lack of classroom participation. We encourage presentations that offer innovative ways to turn these situations into further learning opportunities for students instead of having to only resort to using punitive measures.

Consistent with the ethos of the AAPT, we expect presentations to be short (20–30 minutes), focused on the sharing of teaching ideas and suggestions among participants engendering the sharing of ideas about different ways to teach among participants. We will appreciate proposals that include concrete ideas about how to make the session interactive.

Proposals of no more than 500 words, prepared for anonymous review, should be sent to Andrew M. Winters, andrew.winters@yc.edu, by July 15, 2019. In the subject line please write, “Managing Classroom 2020 Teaching Hub.” In the body of the email, please include your name, institutional affiliation, position, and contact information. Please include a brief explanation of both your approach to classroom management and your experiences having included the techniques you discuss. Attached to the email, please provide an anonymized proposal in PDF format. Supporting material, such as syllabi, handouts, or a CV, is also welcome. We are interested in ensuring representation of a range of voices from different types of institutions (e.g., community college, R1, or state school). We expect to select presenters by early August.

The AAPT-APA Teaching Hub is a series of interactive workshops and conversations designed specifically for philosophers and created to celebrate teaching within the context of the APA divisional meetings. Jointly organized by the APA Committee on the Teaching of Philosophy (CTP) and the American Association of Philosophy Teachers (AAPT), the Teaching Hub aims to offer a range of high-quality and inclusive development opportunities that address the teaching of philosophy at all levels, pre-college through graduate school.

For general information about the AAPT-APA Teaching Hub, please check out the AAPT website and Facebook page and the CTP website and Facebook page. For more specific information about the Teaching Hub at the 2020 Eastern APA meeting in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, please contact Wendy Turgeon at turgeon@optonline.net.

Teaching Core Texts: Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics

The APA Committee on the Teaching of Philosophy (CTP) and the American Association of Philosophy Teachers (AAPT) seek panelists for a session on teaching Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics, at the AAPT-APA Teaching Hub at the 2020 APA Eastern Division meeting, January 8–January 11, 2020, in Philadelphia, PA.

We envision approximately three different presentations on interesting or innovative approaches to teaching Aristotle’s work. We hope to focus discussion mainly on pedagogy but would be interested in various approaches to content, if they are tied to conversations about teaching. We also encourage critical approaches to teaching Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics that may challenge us to think about why and how we teach canonical texts.

Consistent with the ethos of the AAPT, we expect presentations to be short, maybe 20 minutes, engendering the sharing of ideas about different ways to teach the text among participants. We will appreciate proposals which include concrete ideas about how to make the session interactive.

Submissions: Proposals of no more than 500 words, prepared for anonymous review, should be sent to Fritz McDonald, fritzjmcdonald@oakland.edu, by July 15, 2019. Use the subject line “APA/AAPT Aristotle.” Please include a brief explanation of both your approach to teaching the core text and your experiences doing so. Supporting material, such as syllabi or handouts, is also welcome. We are interested in ensuring representation of a range of voices. We expect to select presenters by early August.

Submit Proposals to: Fritz McDonald, fritzjmcdonald@oakland.edu

Email Subject Line: APA/AAPT Aristotle

Deadline for Proposals: 7/15/2019.

Selection of Presenters: Early August

If you have any questions about the session, please feel free to contact Fritz McDonald (fritzjmcdonald@oakland.edu).

The AAPT-APA Teaching Hub is a series of interactive workshops and conversations designed specifically for philosophers and created to celebrate teaching within the context of the APA divisional meetings. Jointly organized by the APA Committee on the Teaching of Philosophy and the American Association of Philosophy Teachers, the Teaching Hub aims to offer a range of high quality and inclusive development opportunities that address the teaching of philosophy at all levels, pre-college though graduate school.

Central Division Meeting

Navigating Working Conditions as Philosophy Teachers

The American Association of Philosophy Teachers (AAPT) and the APA Committee on the Teaching of Philosophy (CTP) invite proposals for a session on navigating the working conditions of philosophy teachers at the Teaching Hub at the 2020 Central Division Meeting of the APA, February 26–29 in Chicago, IL.

We seek presentations that highlight some of the ways in which teachers’ working conditions impact the teaching and learning environment of philosophy classes. We are especially interested in proposals that consider ways to navigate those conditions, and better support philosophy teachers and students in our various roles as co-teachers, colleagues, chairs, deans, and so on. Some possible topics may include, but are not limited to, the following: (in)accessibility issues; non-tenure track, adjunct, and graduate student conditions; unionization efforts; navigating administrative bureaucracy; business models of higher ed; structural injustice; microaggressions; standardization of assessment (of students, teachers, colleagues); and massive online courses.

Format: Teaching Hub sessions are expected to be highly interactive. Proposals should indicate how audience members will participate in the session. One format is a presentation followed by Q&A. Others might have participants working through an interactive experience. The session will consist of three or four presenters.

Submissions: Questions about this session, as well as proposals of no more than 500 words, prepared for anonymous review, should be sent to Kevin Timpe (kevin.timpe@calvin.edu) by September 1, 2019, with “Teaching Hub” as the subject line. Please include a brief explanation of your approach to Navigating Working Conditions as Philosophy Teachers as well as your plan for the presentation. Supporting material, such as syllabi, assignments, or handouts may also be included if relevant.

Deadline for proposals: September 1, 2019. Notifications of decisions by September 15.

The AAPT/APA Teaching Hub is a set of sessions about teaching philosophy held at each of the divisional meetings of the APA, emphasizing inclusive and collegial interactions. The Teaching Hub coordinates conversations about the teaching of philosophy at all levels, pre-college through graduate school. For more information about the Teaching Hub at the 2020 Central Division Meeting, contact Giancarlo Tarantino (gtarantino@luc.edu).

Teaching Core Texts: The Social Contract and Its Critics

The American Association of Philosophy Teachers (AAPT) and the APA Committee on the Teaching of Philosophy (CTP) invite proposals for a session on teaching social contract theory as well as its critics at the Teaching Hub at the 2020 Central Division Meeting of the APA, February 26–29 in Chicago, IL.

We are seeking presentations on interesting or innovative approaches to teaching social contract theory in undergraduate classes. We welcome proposals centered on texts by authors associated with traditional social contract theory (e.g., Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, and others) as well as authors who bring a critical lens to the theory and ask us to question how, why, and whether to teach “canonical” texts (e.g., Carole Pateman, Charles Mills, and others). We hope to focus discussion mainly on pedagogy, but would be interested in various approaches to content, if they are tied to conversations about teaching.

Format: Teaching Hub sessions are expected to be highly interactive. Proposals should indicate how audience members will participate in the session. One format is a presentation followed by Q&A. Others might have participants working through an interactive experience. The session will consist of three or four presenters.

Submissions: Proposals of no more than 500 words, prepared for anonymous review, should be sent to Rebecca Scott (rscott1@harpercollege.edu) by August 15, 2019. Please include a brief explanation of your approach to teaching social contract theory as well as your plan for the presentation. Supporting material such as syllabi, assignments, or handouts may also be included.

Deadline for proposals: August 15, 2019

The AAPT/APA Teaching Hub is a set of sessions about teaching philosophy held at each of the divisional meetings of the APA, emphasizing inclusive and collegial interactions. The Teaching Hub coordinates conversations about the teaching of philosophy at all levels, pre-college through graduate school. For more information about the Teaching Hub at the 2020 Central Division Meeting, contact Giancarlo Tarantino (gtarantino@luc.edu).

Teaching Introductory Courses without Canonical Texts

The APA Committee on Teaching Philosophy invites proposals for a 2020 Teaching Hub session on Teaching Introduction to Philosophy without Canonical Texts as part of the APA/AAPT Teaching Hub at the 2020 Central Division meeting of the APA, February, 26–29, in Chicago, IL.

There are many reasons (e.g., inclusivity) and many ways (e.g., problem-based learning) to teach introductory courses in philosophy without using canonical philosophical texts. We seek creative proposals for interactive sessions that will illustrate, offer approaches to, argue for, or criticize introductory philosophy courses where students do not read canonical texts. Abstracts focused on courses that do not use any philosophy texts at all are also welcome. Discussion of courses where skill development or dispositional growth, as opposed to content mastery, is the primary learning objective are of particular interest. Beyond intellectual interest, sessions where the “takeaway” for, and interactivity of, session attendees is transparent will be favored in the review process. Submissions from philosophers teaching at any level are encouraged.

Format: Teaching Hub sessions are expected to be highly interactive. Proposals should indicate how audience members will participate in the session. One format is a presentation followed by Q&A. Others might have participants working through an interactive experience. The session will consist of three or four presenters.

Submissions: Questions about this session, as well as proposals of no more than 500 words, prepared for anonymous review, should be sent to Claire A. Lockard clockard@luc.edu by September 1, 2019.

Deadline for Proposals: September 1, 2019

The AAPT/APA Teaching Hub is a set of sessions about teaching philosophy held at each of the divisional meetings of the APA, emphasizing inclusive and collegial interactions. The Teaching Hub coordinates conversations about the teaching of philosophy at all levels, pre-college through graduate school. For more information about the Teaching Hub at the 2020 Central Division Meeting, contact Giancarlo Tarantino (gtarantino@luc.edu).

Graduate Voices in Teaching

The APA Committee on Teaching Philosophy invites proposals for a 2020 Teaching Hub session on Graduate Voices in Teaching as part of the APA/AAPT Teaching Hub at the 2020 Central Division meeting of the APA, February 26–29, in Chicago, IL.

Graduate students are a crucial part of the academy’s teaching workforce. However, because of their precarious economic, professional, and social positions, their voices are rarely given uptake in discussions about teaching. Moreover, while they sometimes receive teaching-related support, this support often fails to take into account the particular contexts that graduate students occupy. This Teaching Hub aims to ameliorate these issues by centering graduate student voices. We invite proposals from current graduate students and recent graduates (doctorate received no earlier than September 1, 2017) with experience of teaching in grad school. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to the following:

  • How to identify what teaching support (pedagogical, emotional, or other) is needed as a graduate student, and how to obtain it.
  • Balancing teaching load with other work commitments.
  • Being a good Teaching Assistant and how that differs from being a good Primary Instructor.
  • Dealing productively with a lack of support—from peers, or faculty, or otherwise.
  • Particular challenges that graduate students face when teaching, and how to deal with them.

Format: Teaching Hub sessions are expected to be highly interactive. Proposals should indicate how audience members will participate in the session. One format is a presentation followed by Q&A. Others might have participants working through an interactive experience. The session will consist of three or four presenters.

Submissions: Questions about this session, as well as proposals of no more than 500 words, prepared for anonymous review, should be sent to Chris Blake-Turner (chrisbt@live.unc.edu) by September 1, 2019.

Deadline for Proposals: September 1, 2019.

The AAPT/APA Teaching Hub is a set of sessions about teaching philosophy held at each of the divisional meetings of the APA, emphasizing inclusive and collegial interactions. The Teaching Hub coordinates conversations about the teaching of philosophy at all levels, pre-college through graduate school. For more information about the Teaching Hub at the 2020 Central Division Meeting, contact Giancarlo Tarantino (gtarantino@luc.edu).

AAPT Workshop: Bringing Research and Pedagogy Together in the Classroom

The American Association of Philosophy Teachers (AAPT), in collaboration with the APA Committee on the Teaching of Philosophy, seeks presentations for an interactive workshop at the upcoming Teaching Hub at the 2020 Central Division Meeting of the American Philosophical Association, February 26–29 in Chicago, IL.

We are seeking presentations from philosophers on how their research shapes their approach to teaching and vice versa. As philosophers, we sometimes (often?) think of our teaching and research as separate. But maybe you are a philosopher who sees your teaching and research as overlapping in meaningful ways. If so, please consider submitting a proposal for this session.

Format: Teaching Hub sessions are expected to be highly interactive. Proposals should indicate how audience members will participate in the session. One format is a presentation followed by Q&A. Others might have participants working through an interactive experience. The session will consist of three or four presenters.

Submissions: Questions about this session as well as proposals of no more than 500 words, prepared for anonymous review, should be sent to Merritt Rehn-DeBraal (mrehndeb@gmail.com) by September 1, 2019.

Deadline for Proposals: September 1, 2019

The AAPT/APA Teaching Hub is a set of sessions about teaching philosophy held at each of the divisional meetings of the APA, emphasizing inclusive and collegial interactions. The Teaching Hub coordinates conversations about the teaching of philosophy at all levels, pre-college through graduate school. For more information about the Teaching Hub at the 2020 Central Division Meeting, contact Giancarlo Tarantino (gtarantino@luc.edu).

Pacific Division Meeting

Teaching Asian Philosophical Classics

The APA Committee on Asian and Asian-American Philosophers and Philosophies seeks participants for a roundtable panel on how to teach Asian philosophical text at the AAPT-APA Teaching Hub at the 2020 APA Pacific Division meeting, April 8–29, 2020, in San Francisco, CA.

Teaching a pre-modern philosophical text presents special challenges to both the instructor and the students. Teaching classics from non-Western traditions compounds the difficulty. This panel is designed to convey the experiences of instructors who have taught Asian philosophical classics with the purpose of easing the way for others who would like to do the same but aren’t sure how to do it or even where to begin.

Regardless of your own background in Asian philosophy, if you have experience teaching Asian philosophical classics and would like to share that experience for the benefit of others, we welcome your participation in this roundtable panel. We seek a range of backgrounds and expertise, from the Asianist who has a competent command of relevant languages to the metaphysician, epistemologist, etc., who has explored Asian texts as a supplement to more canonical texts. The aim of the panel is to bring teachers into conversation about useful ways of teaching Asian philosophical classics. What has worked and what hasn’t? What difficulties have you encountered in finding, researching, or conveying the material of Asian classics? How is teaching an Asian classic distinct from teaching other texts? Which texts have you found useful? How have you helped students access a distinct set of concepts and intellectual contexts?

We envision a 3-hour panel with five approximately 20-minute presentations and a full hour for discussion among panelists and audience members.

Submissions: Proposals prepared for anonymous review of 250 words should be sent to Brian Bruya, Chair of the APA Committee on Asian and Asian-American Philosophers and Philosophies, at bbruya@emich.edu with the subject line “TH Submission: Asian Classics.” In the body of the email, please include your name, institutional affiliation (if any), position (if any), and contact information. Attach to the email proposals that address to the following items: 1) the text or texts that you have taught, 2) the subject matter and level of the course in which each text was taught, 3) your own background in Asian philosophy and language with regard to both formal training and informal study, 4) an abstract of your proposed presentation.

Deadline for Proposals: September 3, 2019

Selection of Presenters: late September 2019

Questions about this session should be directed to Brian Bruya at the address above. A stable version of the call will live on the CTP page of the APA website:http://www.apaonline.org/group/teaching, where you can find additional information about other Teaching Hub calls, the CTP's Facebook page, and our committee's activities.

By submitting a proposal, you commit to participating in the panel at the APA Pacific Division Meeting (April 8–29, 2020) should your proposal be selected.

The AAPT-APA Teaching Hub is a series of interactive workshops and conversations designed specifically for philosophers and created to celebrate teaching within the context of the APA divisional meetings. Jointly organized by the APA Committee on the Teaching of Philosophy (CTP) and the American Association of Philosophy Teachers (AAPT), the Teaching Hub aims to offer a range of high-quality and inclusive development opportunities that address the teaching of philosophy at all levels, pre-college through graduate school.

For general information about the AAPT-APA Teaching Hub, please check out the AAPT website and Facebook page and the CTP website and Facebook page. For more specific information about the Teaching Hub at the 2020 Pacific APA meeting in San Francisco, California, please contact Renée Smith at rsmith@coastal.edu.

Syllabus Makeover Competition

Would you like concrete advice for including multicultural content in a course you teach? If so, please consider sending us: 1) the current reading list for one of your philosophy courses, and 2) general or specific guidelines about the kinds of changes that interest you.

Of the syllabi submitted, we'll select two for the competition to be held as part of the Teaching Hub in the main program of the 2020 Pacific APA.

Ahead of the competition, three specialists (panel contestants) in cross-cultural philosophy and in the relevant field(s) of philosophy that the syllabus falls under will separately revise your syllabus by adding a greater diversity of readings to meet your guidelines and provide a list of relevant background material.  

You and the three contestants will then meet at the APA Pacific, where each contestant will give a brief presentation, explaining and justifying the proposed revisions.  After the three presentations, you will select the winner and explain why that contestant's revision best suits the needs of your course.

Submissions: A syllabus in any area of philosophy prepared for anonymous review should be sent to Brian Bruya, at bbruya@emich.edu with the subject line, “TH Submission: Syllabus Makeover.” In the body of the email, please include your name, institutional affiliation (if any), position (if any), and contact information. Attach to the email a syllabus meeting these criteria: Clear and concise list of readings; a course that would likely appeal to a general audience of philosophers (i.e., not too narrow in scope); clarity and feasibility of guidelines for suggested changes.

Deadline for Submissions: September 3, 2019

Selection of Syllabi: late September 2019

By submitting a syllabus, you commit to participating in our panel at the APA Pacific Division Meeting (April 8–12, 2020) should your syllabus be selected. 

Questions about this session should be directed to Brian Bruya at the address above. A stable version of the call will live on the CTP page of the APA website http://www.apaonline.org/group/teaching, where you can find additional information about other Teaching Hub calls, the CTP's Facebook page, and our committee's activities.

The AAPT-APA Teaching Hub is a series of interactive workshops and conversations designed specifically for philosophers and created to celebrate teaching within the context of the APA divisional meetings. Jointly organized by the APA Committee on the Teaching of Philosophy (CTP) and the American Association of Philosophy Teachers (AAPT), the Teaching Hub aims to offer a range of high-quality and inclusive development opportunities that address the teaching of philosophy at all levels, pre-college through graduate school.

For general information about the AAPT-APA Teaching Hub, please check out the AAPT website and Facebook page and the CTP website and Facebook page. For more specific information about the Teaching Hub at the 2020 Pacific APA meeting in San Francisco, California, please contact Renée Smith at rsmith@coastal.edu.

Teaching Philosophy of Race or Gender: Challenges and Solutions

The APA Committee on Teaching Philosophy seeks presenters for a session on teaching philosophy of race or gender at the AAPT-APA Teaching Hub at the 2020 APA Pacific Division meeting, April 8–12, 2020, in San Francisco, CA.

If a colleague were teaching a course on philosophy of race and/or gender for the first time, what distinctive challenges would you warn them of and what advice would you offer for coping with those challenges? What challenges have you encountered when teaching these courses or topics, and how do you think these challenges might be overcome? In this session, we will have an honest and open discussion aimed at better preparing ourselves—and at preparing ourselves to help others—to think through and plan for any distinctive challenges associated with teaching these kinds of courses and issues. Possible topics include (but certainly are not limited to):

  • How to create classroom environments that promote open and respectful discussions about race, ethnicity, gender, and sex
  • Which ideas, arguments, positions, and thinkers deserve a hearing in these courses
  • How to address potentially problematic binary thinking in students and/or instructors (e.g., black/white binary, man/woman binary)
  • What role student and instructor identities should or do play in content selection, class discussions, etc.
  • Whom these classes are for
  • What learning goals these classes should serve
  • How to minimize and respond to student alienation
  • How to manage risk of epistemic exploitation
  • How to encourage uptake of ideas among resistant students
  • How to balance (i) generalizations or abstractions concerning race, ethnicity, gender and (ii) respect for student individuality
  • How to balance and manage language regimentation, political correctness, and free speech
  • How to manage (vast) differences in background knowledge/experience among students
  • How to find the right balance of philosophical and other content
  • How to retain student motivation and forestall hopelessness without minimizing the gravity or seriousness of the material

The ideal abstract will identify a distinctive challenge associated with teaching these courses, and describe a plausible solution. (A ‘distinctive challenge’ is a challenge that derives at least in part from the fact that these courses are about race, ethnicity, gender, sex, and other aspects related to identity.) The plausible solution may be one you’ve tried with some success and would consider recommending to others or one you’re considering implementing and want to bring to the table for discussion.

Submissions: Abstracts prepared for anonymous review should be sent to Josh DiPaolo (joshuadipaolo@gmail.com) with the subject line “Teaching Hub: Race/Gender.” In the body of the email, please include your name, institutional affiliation (if any), position (if any), and contact information. Attached to the email, please include an anonymized abstract of 500–750 words (in .doc, .docx, or .pdf form) describing the focus of your presentation and what you hope the audience will take away from it. The Teaching Hub aims to engage audience members as active participants, so we prefer presentations that capture this interactive spirit. The organizing committee will select 3–4 participants for the session by mid-September and will aim to assemble a panel that is diverse in many respects, including career stage and institutional affiliation.

Deadline for Submissions: September 3, 2019

Selection of Presenters: late September 2019

Questions about this session should be directed to Josh DiPaolo at the address above.

By submitting a proposal, you commit to participating in the panel at the APA Pacific Division Meeting (April 8–12, 2020) should your proposal be selected.

The AAPT-APA Teaching Hub is a series of interactive workshops and conversations designed specifically for philosophers and created to celebrate teaching within the context of the APA divisional meetings. Jointly organized by the APA Committee on the Teaching of Philosophy (CTP) and the American Association of Philosophy Teachers (AAPT), the Teaching Hub aims to offer a range of high-quality and inclusive development opportunities that address the teaching of philosophy at all levels, pre-college through graduate school.

For general information about the AAPT-APA Teaching Hub, please check out the AAPT website and Facebook page and the CTP website and Facebook page. For more specific information about the Teaching Hub at the 2020 Pacific APA meeting in San Francisco, California, please contact Renée Smith at rsmith@coastal.edu.

Addressing Student Resistance and Alternative Facts: Classroom Activities and Assignments

Please consider submitting an abstract for this Teaching Hub session sponsored by the APA Committee on Teaching Philosophy and the American Association of Philosophy Teachers, planned for the Pacific Division Meeting of the American Philosophical Association in San Francisco, CA, from April 8–12, 2020.

The Teaching Hub is a collaborative meeting space, co-sponsored by the APA Committee on the Teaching of Philosophy (CTP) and the American Association of Philosophy Teachers (AAPT) that hosts a series of informative programs about the teaching of philosophy at divisional meetings of the APA. The CTP invites abstracts on addressing student resistance to factual information and how to respond to students promoting or making arguments based on ‘alternative facts’. Sample ideas for presentations could include:

  • Lesson plans on evaluating information acquired via the Internet;
  • Lesson plans on media literacy and critical thinking in relation to the media;
  • Lesson plans on evaluating information acquired via social media;
  • Lesson plans on library literacy and research;
  • Specific strategies for responding to students defending ‘alternative facts’;
  • Specific strategies for responding to students who don’t want to accept facts that contradict their personal ideologies;
  • An examination of student motivations for resistance and how to address these motivations;
  • Case studies of specific examples of resistance and the strategies employed to successfully or unsuccessfully confront them;
  • Dealing with student ‘trolls’;
  • Managing class discussions around contentious issues with ideologically diverse students;
  • Addressing and dealing with white/male privilege and fragility in the classroom.

Submissions: Abstracts prepared for anonymous review should be sent to Ian Duckles at iduckles@sdccd.edu with the subject line “TH Submission: Student Resistance.” In the body of the email, please include your name, institutional affiliation (if any), position (if any), and contact information. Attached to the email, please include an anonymized abstract of 500–750 words (in .doc, .docx, or .pdf form) describing the focus of your presentation and what you hope the audience will take away from your presentation. The Teaching Hub aims to engage audience members as active participants, so we prefer presentations that capture this interactive spirit. The organizing committee will select 3–4 participants for the session by late-September and will aim to assemble a panel that is diverse in many respects, including career stage and institutional affiliation.

Deadline for Submissions: September 3, 2019

Selection of Presenters: late September 2019

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact Ian Duckles at the above address. A stable version of the call will live on the CTP page of the APA website, where you can find additional information about other Teaching Hub calls, the CTP's Facebook page, and our committee's activities

The AAPT-APA Teaching Hub is a series of interactive workshops and conversations designed specifically for philosophers and created to celebrate teaching within the context of the APA divisional meetings. Jointly organized by the APA Committee on the Teaching of Philosophy (CTP) and the American Association of Philosophy Teachers (AAPT), the Teaching Hub aims to offer a range of high-quality and inclusive development opportunities that address the teaching of philosophy at all levels, pre-college through graduate school.

For general information about the AAPT-APA Teaching Hub, please check out the AAPT website and Facebook page and the CTP website and Facebook page. For more specific information about the Teaching Hub at the 2020 Pacific APA meeting in San Francisco, California, please contact Renée Smith at rsmith@coastal.edu.

Metaphilosophy for Undergraduates

Philosophers think it a good thing for undergraduates in the sciences to take a course in the philosophy of science or for those in the arts or in design to take a course in the philosophy of art. Similarly philosophers should perhaps think it beneficial for undergraduates in philosophy to take a course in the philosophy of philosophy. The APA Committee on the Teaching of Philosophy (CTP) and the American Association of Philosophy Teachers (AAPT) seek panelists for a session on teaching such a course at the AAPT-APA Teaching Hub at the APA Pacific divisional meeting in San Francisco, CA, April 8–12, 2020.

We envision three or four different presentations on interesting or innovative approaches to teaching the philosophy of philosophy as an undergraduate class. We hope to focus discussion mainly on pedagogy, but would be interested in various approaches to content, so long as they are tied to teaching. We expect presentations to be short, maybe fifteen minutes, engendering the sharing of ideas about different ways to teach such a course among participants. We will appreciate proposals which include concrete ideas about how to make the session interactive.

Some possible topics include but certainly are not restricted to:

  • the appropriate content for such a course
  • examples of successful courses
  • courses on experimental philosophy and other particular methods of doing philosophy
  • presentations on special parts of such a course, for example, a section of such a course on thought experiments
  • helpful resources for the teaching of such courses

Submissions: Proposals of no more than 500 words, prepared for anonymous review, should be sent to Leslie Burkholder (leslie.burkholder@ubc.ca) the session organizer, with the subject line, “TH Submission: Metaphilosophy.” In the body of the email, please include your name, institutional affiliation (if any), position (if any), and contact information. Attach to the email your proposal prepared for anonymous review and any supporting material, such as syllabi or handouts. We are interested in ensuring representation of a range of voices.

Deadline for Submissions: September 3, 2019

Selection of Presenters: late September 2019

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact Leslie Burkholder at the above address. A stable version of the call will be live on the CTP page of the APA website, where you can find additional information about other Teaching Hub calls, the CTP's Facebook page, and our committee's activities.

The AAPT-APA Teaching Hub is a series of interactive workshops and conversations designed specifically for philosophers and created to celebrate teaching within the context of the APA divisional meetings. Jointly organized by the APA Committee on the Teaching of Philosophy (CTP) and the American Association of Philosophy Teachers (AAPT), the Teaching Hub aims to offer a range of high-quality and inclusive development opportunities that address the teaching of philosophy at all levels, pre-college through graduate school.

For general information about the AAPT-APA Teaching Hub, please check out the AAPT website and Facebook page and the CTP website and Facebook page. For more specific information about the Teaching Hub at the 2020 Pacific APA meeting in San Francisco, California, please contact Renée Smith at rsmith@coastal.edu.

All Three Meetings

Eastern, Central, and Pacific AAPT-APA Teaching Hub Poster Sessions

The APA Committee on the Teaching of Philosophy (CTP) and the American Association of Philosophy Teachers (AAPT) invite abstracts for the three AAPT-APA Teaching Hub poster sessions to be held throughout the spring of 2020.

Each Teaching Hub includes a reception and poster session featuring both independent work by undergraduate students and innovative work in the teaching of philosophy by faculty and graduate students. If you have something of your own to share with your colleagues—a new teaching technique, course proposal, assessment strategy, in-class activity, or SoTL research finding—please consider submitting an abstract to one of the Teaching Hub poster sessions below. Please also encourage undergraduates who have completed independent work in philosophy this past academic year and undergraduates who are working on summer research projects in philosophy currently to submit their abstracts.

We are looking for proposals for either two kinds of posters:

  1. Undergraduate students
    Posters featuring independent research by undergraduates (e.g., thesis, independent study). Deadline: November 15, 2019
  2. Faculty or graduate students
    Posters featuring pedagogical innovations or Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL). Deadline: August 15, 2019

Please e-mail abstracts of no more than 300 words as PDF attachments, prepared for anonymous review, to Kaitlin Pettit (kaitlin.pettit@utah.edu) with the subject line “2020 (Eastern, Central, or Pacific) TH poster session submission.”

You may submit a proposal to more than one poster session. However, we will only accept distinct proposals to different poster sessions. If you would like to submit the same proposal to more than one poster session, please include in your email a ranking of your preferred meeting locations.

  • Eastern Teaching Hub Poster Session: January 10, 2020, Philadelphia, PA
  • Central Teaching Hub Poster Session: February 28, 2020, Chicago, IL
  • Pacific Teaching Hub Poster Session: April 10, 2020, San Francisco, CA

The Teaching Hub aims to be an especially inclusive and collegial event, designed to recognize exceptional teaching and mentorship. Faculty members who have organized a trip with a group of undergraduates to one of the APA divisional meetings, in order to present work at the Teaching Hub, have described the experience as transformative for their students.

We look forward to receiving your submissions.

Kaitlin Louise Pettit, University of Utah
2020 Teaching Hub Poster Session Coordinator

Russell Marcus and Wendy Turgeon
2020 Eastern Teaching Hub Co-Chairs

Rebecca Scott and Giancarlo Tarantino
2020 Central Teaching Hub Co-Chairs

Ian Smith and Renee Smith
2020 Pacific Teaching Hub Co-Chairs

The AAPT-APA Teaching Hub is a series of interactive workshops and conversations designed specifically for philosophers and created to celebrate teaching within the context of the APA divisional meetings. Jointly organized by the CTP and the AAPT, the Teaching Hub aims to offer a range of high-quality and inclusive development opportunities that address the teaching of philosophy at all levels, pre-college through graduate school.

Important note: Neither the APA nor the AAPT can offer funding to Teaching Hub participants for travel or lodging. Moreover, to present at the Teaching Hub, participants must both join the APA and register for the appropriate meeting (less than $30 total for undergraduates). Please alert your students to these facts before they apply and consider reserving institutional funding for their participation.

AAPT-APA Teaching Hub page

The American Philosophical Association
University of Delaware
31 Amstel Avenue, Newark, DE 19716
Phone: 302.831.1112 | Fax: 302.831.8690
Email: info@apaonline.org